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MySQL Feed

Oracle MySQL resources, news, and support articles.

Trawling the binlog with FlexCDC and new FlexCDC plugins for MySQL

Swanhart-Tools includes FlexCDC, a change data capture tool for MySQL. FlexCDC follows a server’s binary log and usually writes “changelogs” that track the changes to tables in the database.

Trawling the binlog with FlexCDC and new FlexCDC plugins for MySQL

Swanhart-Tools includes FlexCDC, a change data capture tool for MySQL. FlexCDC follows a server’s binary log and usually writes “changelogs” that track the changes to tables in the database.

mysqld_multi: How to run multiple instances of MySQL

The need to have multiple instances of MySQL (the well-known mysqld process) running in the same server concurrently in a transparent way, instead of having them executed in separate containers/virtual machines, is not very common. Yet from time to time the Percona Support team receives a request from a customer to assist in the configuration of such an environment.

mysqld_multi: How to run multiple instances of MySQL

The need to have multiple instances of MySQL (the well-known mysqld process) running in the same server concurrently in a transparent way, instead of having them executed in separate containers/virtual machines, is not very common. Yet from time to time the Percona Support team receives a request from a customer to assist in the configuration of such an environment.

Workbench 6.2, CakePHP’s new ORM, and OKC Meetup on Wednesday

In the beginning was the MySQL command line and it was good. Verbose yes, error prone yes, and even tedious. But it was good. The UPDATE USER set SELECT_PRIV=’Y’, DROP_PRIV_’Y”, UPDATE_PRIV=’Y’,……,LAST_BLOODY_PRIV=’Y”; type errors have caught of us old timers. But it was still good.

Then came some GUI tools that were okay. Not great but they had their uses.

And then came MySQL Workbench. And it was very good.

OpenStack’s Trove: The benefits of this database as a service (DBaaS)

In a previous post, my colleague Dimitri Vanoverbeke discussed at a high level the concepts of database as a service (DBaaS), OpenStack and OpenStack’s implementation of a DBaaS, Trove. Today I’d like to delve a bit further into Trove and discuss where it fits in, and who benefits.

When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his server who was looking for a way to make the ibdata1 file shrink.

When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his server who was looking for a way to make the ibdata1 file shrink.

Trove and OpenStack

In a previous blog, my colleague Dimitri Vanoverbeke, discussed at a high level the concepts of database as a service, OpenStack and OpenStack’s implementation of a DBaaS, Trove. Today I’d like to delve a bit further into Trove and discuss where it fits in, and who benefits. First off, I’d like to point out that

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