view counter

PL/SQL Feed

Oracle PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) resources, news, and support articles.

SQL Quiz: How do inserts create database objects?

I insert a row into a table, roll it back, yet somehow I’ve created a new object in my database!

Free Oracle NoSQL Book

It’s seldom that Oracle makes an effort to give an Oracle Press book away for free, but they’ve done it. You can download the Getting Started with Oracle NoSQL Database book from Oracle Press for free.

Getting Started with Oracle NoSQL Database

OracleNoSQL

Do animals have souls?

OK, first of all, don't tell me your answer to this question. That would make the rest of this post seem a bit rude.

Here is one of the dumbest questions I can ever imagine a person asking, much less answering:

Do animals have souls?
How utterly ridiculous.
No one knows what a soul is. No one knows what it looks like, what it means, whether or not it really exists.

Parsing DBMS_OUTPUT

Testing with DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE is always a bit of a problem when you have strings longer than 80 characters in length, which occurs more frequently with Oracle Database 12c. An example of managing output occurs when you want to print a string with embedded line breaks. My solution is the following parse_rows procedure:

Java File IO

Java 6, or the java.io.* package which has been around a long time has known limits. There are some noted issues with the Java 6 java.io.* package, and why I wrote the FileIO.java file back in 2002:

Oracle 12c VARCHAR2?

The Oracle Database 12c documentation says you can set the maximum size of a VARCHAR2 to 32,767 bytes. That’s true except when you’re trying to map a large Java string to a VARCHAR2. It fails when the physical size of the Java string is greater than 4,000 bytes with an ORA-01002 or fetch out of sequence error.

Oracle can now use function-based indexes in queries without functions!

There’s a neat optimization in Oracle I found while tinkering around (look closely at the predicate section):

Bill Cosby the Mathematician

Leafing my way through the Chicago Reader, I came across this ad:

It took me a moment to sort it out. Can you?

view counter