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PL/SQL Feed

Oracle PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) resources, news, and support articles.

Automatic database links in SQLDeveloper

People invent really complicated ways to achieve simple tasks such as copying a table from one database to another. With database link (which is arguably RDBMS’s the most under appreciated feature) it is just one SQL command:

create table emp as select * from scott.emp@dblink1;

But who has time to create database links? In SQLDeveloper 4.0 you don’t have to. Assuming that you have the right connection the script

Beyond Analytics: MODEL or MATCH_RECOGNIZE

Analytic functions are powerful and efficient, but sometimes they just aren’t enough. When you try analytics and they alone don’t solve the problem, it’s time to think about the MODEL clause – or upgrade to 12c and use MATCH_RECOGNIZE. All three can use partitions and ordering for simpler, more efficient processing. To illustrate, here’s a […]

Current_Schema and the Data Dictionary

Being a huge fan of Logger, the PL/SQL logging utility, I really wanted this be to included in the project that I'm currently working on. So I downloaded it (link at the bottom of this blog) and included it in our deployment scripts. Done.... at least I thought so, but of course this wasn't the case.

When Joins Go Bad

So far in the joins series we’ve looked at the effect removing joins (via denormalization) has on performance. We’ve seen that joins can cause primary key looks to do more work. Lowering the normalization level to remove these can negatively impact “search” style queries though. More importantly, we’ve seen the real cost of denormalizing to remove joins is when updating records, potentially leading to concurrency waits and application bugs.
So are joins always “good”?

Down with Firefox

Warning: this post is not technical and it is not about Oracle. Brendan Eich recently resigned under pressure from his job as CEO of Mozilla, the makers of Firefox. The reason given was a campaign contribution that Mr. Eich made in 2008. The State of California has the “referendum”: a proposition is submitted to a […]

Denormalizing for Performance is a Bad Idea – Your Updates are Killing Me

In the previous article in the joins series we compared query performance between a third normal form schema and the same schema denormalized to second normal form. We then extended it the example so our denormalized schema was in just first normal form.

To_char, Infinity and NaN

Funny that oracle can easily cast ‘nan’,’inf’,’infinity’,’-inf’,’-infinity’ to corresponding binary_float_infinity,binary_double_nan, but there is no any format models for to_char(binary_float_infinity,format) or to_binary_***(text_expr,format) that can output the same as to_char(binary_float_infinity)/to_binary_float(‘inf’) without format parameter:

Denormalizing for Performance Is a Bad Idea

Continuing the series on joins, I’m going to look at denormalization. This process reduces the number of joins necessary to return results for a schema.
One of the big arguments against normalizing data is “for performance”. The process of normalization creates new tables as relations are decomposed according to their functional dependencies. This means (more) joins are necessary to return the same results.

Deterministic functions, result_cache and operators

In previous posts about caching mechanism of determinstic functions I wrote that cached results are kept only between fetch calls, but there is one exception from this rule: if all function parameters are literals, cached result will not be flushed every fetch call.
Little example with difference:

DBMS_JAVA Privilege Error?

It’s possible to get an error after granting privileges to an external file system. One of those errors is tedious to resolve until you understand the rules governing Java NIO file permissions.

You grant privileges to external file systems as the sys user with the grant_permission procedure of the dbms_java package, like

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